David Warner says India has found perfect team balance

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It's been a period of his career where he's displayed an unimaginable appetite for runs, the kind you don't expect from as explosive a batsman as the left-hander.

Only a few hours later he would be accorded with the prestigious Allan Border Medal completing a dramatic turnaround that has seen him transform from the ‘problem child’ of Australian cricket to its ultimate match-winner.

It’s been a period of his career where he’s displayed an unimaginable appetite for runs, the kind you don’t expect from as explosive a batsman as the left-hander.

But as he met the media at Melbourne’s Tullamarine Airport on Wednesday, the diminutive opener seemed more concerned about his hunger of another kind. While the rest of Australia’s cricketing fraternity was excitedly awaiting the results of the awards ceremony, Warner was looking forward to the dinner menu, on which he was hoping to locate some chicken. He then ruled himself out of the race, tipping Test and ODI captain Steve Smith to win instead. He was to be very wrong.

But the attention soon turned towards the T20 series, and the Australian batsmen’s biggest nemeses, spinners R Ashwin and Ravindra Jadeja, not to forget their impact on the opening game which went the visitors’ way. And Warner insisted that his team will have to tread carefully against the duo.

“Losing 4 for 50 in eight overs to spin is not ideal. Something we have to work on is trying to pinch those twos and hitting the ball down the ground. You can go for the odd big shot – generally that comes in the first two balls of the over – and then you’ve got to try and see if you can get six-seven an over after that. But in the first six overs, you’re always going to take your chances like Aaron (Finch) did last night,” Warner said.

The Australians fell short by 37 runs as Ashwin and Jadeja took two wickets each. Like India. (N24India)